Outcast By some unknown traveler ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~   1. Intro   This book is the sole expression of my life, its meaning (if any) and my feelings in general, since the day I was born. Some things won’t be believed, but that is how I exprienced them, because I feel a huge desire to share them, for some unknown reason. And yeah I’m listening to cool music while I am writing this, which is pretty damn awesome to do. I actually think its a cool thing to do, to write the story of your life, in a simple txt notepad file, and share it with the world. If you don’t find this interesting of course, feel free to skip this, but I promise I will try to keep things interesting.   2. Visions of childhood   The first thing / memory I remember from my life and childhood, is my actual birth. You may find it hard to believe how a person can remember his own birth, but I remember a small fraction. I remember visions up until today, of being inside a red tunnel (sounds funny doesn’t it), sliding down and coming out to a number of unfamiliar faces. I think there were a few doctors around me when I came out, but I’m not sure about that. Since then, I will try now to remember what comes to my head first because it’s not simple to remember your own early childhood as some of it is kind of erased from your memory for some reason..   So, the first thing I remember after that, the earliest memory, is either going to pray with my father on a friday (I was born and raised jewish, that’s how it was), or a clear memory of my brother’s wedding day.   I think it was the earlier, because the memory of my brother’s wedding is more clear. I remember everyone liking the…

Norma Jeane Mortenson

  I was also fortunate enough to land a part time job working as a darkroom accent for, Consolidated Film Industries. Consolidated Film Industries was a film laboratory and film processing company, and was one of the leading film laboratories in the Los Angeles area for many decades. CFI processed negatives and made prints for motion pictures industry, where I worked for four years. I was just 16 years old when I started.   Gladys Baker, the mother of Marilyn Monroe, worked for Consolidated as a negative film cutter; Marilyn Monroe’s biological father is believed to have been fellow consolidated employee Charles Stanley Gifford. I would see Norma Jeane Mortenson at the gate of the film laboratory waiting for her mother sometimes we would site down on the kerbstone and she would talk all the time never stopped talking. She was just 18 years old..   After graduating as an electrical engineer from California Institute of Technology I was hired by Byron Haskin, ASC, and head of the Warner Bros. Special Effects Department on Stage 5 in Burbank. Since this was the largest such department in the movie business, I was able to work with some of the top cinematographers in the effects field, such as ASC fellows Edwin  DuPar, Hans Koenekamp and Warren Lynch. When Warner Bros. purchased First National’s studio in Burbank, California, I signed a contract and remained with the studio on and off for the next 40 years.   Throughout the 40 years in the movie industry i only worked with Marilyn Monroe one’s in the film River of No Return (1954) on the first day of shutting she came right in front of everyone a said to me “you made it” my little neg man and gave me a kiss.  You must remember that it’s an unwritten law the film crew do not talk to the actress on the film set.  She never stops talking about the…

Kimberly Kay Clark, 39 of OKC died Wednesday, April 19, 1995 in the disaster at the Federal Building in OKC. Kim was born in Hong Kong, China on Feb. 24, 1956 and was adopted by Tommie & Agatha Lee Clark and became their “China Doll” on August 14, 1959. She became a US Citizen on December 6, 1962. Kim is survived by her parents Tommie and Agatha Lee Clark of Midwest City, her fiance’ Namat Moini of OKC, 2 brothers Dale Clark & his wife Ila and their sons Taylor & Kevin of Olathe, KS; and Donald Clark and his wife Yvonne of Midwest City and their children Lorri Dawn, Chris, Cari, and grandson Dylan; as well as numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. Kim attended Westside Elementary, Jarman Jr. High & Midwest City High School. She also attended Rose State College, University of Central Oklahoma and the Oklahoma City Community College. She recieved an Associates Degree in Paralegal Studies. Kim was employed by HUD, as a Legal Assistant and was a 1st Class Petty Officer on active status in the US Naval Reserve. Kimi, as she is known to her family, preferred to give and do for others. She was strong and independent and continually strived to better herself through education. She was a loving & giving daughter, sister, aunt, cousin, and friend. She was outgoing and friendly, always laughing and generous with her love and time. She was adventurous and enjoyed long distance biking and traveling.

Charles Edgar Huffman1873 – 1963  Timeline Born 21 September 1873 at Elk, Phelps County, Missouri1880 Federal Census    Residence:  Cold Spring township, Phelps County, Missouri    John Whitley (head), Elwilda, Margaret, Bertha W.1900 Federal Census    Residence:  Cold Spring township, Phelps County, Missouri    Ara, Vivian A., Olive A, Charles E.    Clark O. Shaw listed as servant1910 Federal Census    Residence:  Oklahoma City Ward 2, Oklahoma    Ara, Vivian, Daisy, Carl    Occupation: Contractor12 September 1915  WW I draft registration signed    5'8” tall, medium build, blue eyes    FHL Roll Number: 1852061    DraftBoard: 3    Occupation:  Gen’l Contractor1920 Federal Census    Residence:  Oklahoma City Ward 1, Oklahoma    Katherine, Carl, Teddy    Occupation: Contractor – houses 1925 – 1928 built the Harbour-Longmire Furniture Company building in Oklahoma CityUnder construction in 1925 or 1928 at 420 W. Main.  1930 Federal Census    Residence:  Oklahoma City Ward 1, Oklahoma    Catherine, Ted, Billy    Wallace King listed as servant (negro)    Tiny King listed as maid (negro)    Occupation: Contractor – building 1931 Oklahoma City Stockyards Coliseum built by C.E. Huffman Construction    1936 Trip to Paris, France:    08 August 1936 departed from Le Havre, France    16 August 1936 arrived in New York, New York Died 18 October 1963 Oklahoma City, Canadian Co., Oklahoma  Family PicturesJohn Whitley Huffman and Alwilda Falls Family PictureMargaret, Charles Edgar, Bertha Winnifred 

Anica, Lihan en Benig.Dit is vandag die 24ste Maart 2013. Ek was die naweek in Polokwane om by Lihan en Brenig te gaan kuier. Om julle twee te sien maak soveel emosies in mens los, ek hou nie daarvan om totsiens te se tot ek julle weer sien nie, dit voel vir Pappa so verkeerd. Ek is nie elke dag by julle nie, dit is nie maklik nie, ek weet julle verlang baie na my. Ek verlang self elke dag na julle!!Julle wonder sekerlik hoekom ek hier begin skryf het, wel julle: Ek het nooit ‘n Pa gehad nie, dit het maar moeilik gegaan op tye en ek sal tot vandag toe graag nog ‘n Pa wil he – (Ek gaan julle meer hieroor vertel soos ons aangaan) As julle eendag our is gaan julle wil lees en ek dink die is die beste manie om julle ook ‘n deel van my te maak, op my eie manier.Sus, ek verlang ook na jou. Ek het jou verlede naweek laas gesien, dink dalk hierdie naweek is weer tyd om jou te sien en saam jou die dag te spandeer. Ek is seker ek sal daar uitkom.Kom elke dag terug, of druk hierdie en lees dit. Julle het ook dan vir my by julle!!Pappa!!

Speech given at the Opening ceremony of the 13th International AIDS Conference in Durban, July, 2000"Hi, my name is Nkosi Johnson. I live in Melville, Johannesburg, South Africa. I am 11 years old and I have full-blown AIDS. I was born HIV-positive. When I was two years old, I was living in a care center for HIV / AIDS-infected people. My mommy was obviously also infected and could not afford to keep me because she was very scared that thecommunity she lived in would find out that we were both infected and chase us away.I know she loved me very much and would visit me when she could. And then the care center had to close down because they didn't have any funds. So my foster mother, Gail Johnson, who was a director of the care center and had taken me home for weekends, said at a board meeting she would take me home. She took me home with her and I have been living with her for eight years now.She has taught me all about being infected and how I must be careful with my blood. If I fall and cut myself and bleed, then I must make sure that I cover my own wound and go to an adult to help me clean it and put a plaster on it.I know that my blood is only dangerous to other people if they also have an open wound and my blood goes into it. That is the only time that people need to be careful when touching me.In 1997 mommy Gail went to the school, Melpark Primary, and she had to fill in a form for my admission and it said does your child suffer from anything so she said yes: AIDS.My mommy Gail and I have always been open about me having AIDS. And then my mommy Gail was waiting to hear if I was admitted to school.…

This is my mother's story. She is a remarkable woman who has led a remarkable life. Her name is Shashikala Madhav Bhagwat. We call her Ai. Ai is now ninety seven years old. At seventy five pounds, she is small and frail, she depends on people to take care of her. Her mind is still very sharp, and her zest for life still in tact. When she is in India, she still enjoys a play, a movie, a lecture, a political talk show on TV. She savors a good meal with relish, which she critiques like a magazine foodie. She loves visits from friends and well wishers. She is curious about everything. She loves gossip. She is always ready to travel.She does not have a sense of style, but loves to wear colorful sarees that were in fashion fifty years ago. Yes, I believe even now she is more interested in living a full life than many people much younger than her!For sure, my mother is just a regular person. She not a poet nor an author, not a scientist nor an entrepreneur. At four foot ten, she never had an imposing physical presence. She has all the failings of a normal human being, she is loving yet sometimes unforgiving, demanding, critical and often stubborn. Her words sometimes have sharp edges, a trait that is particularly hard for her caregivers to cope with. I look at her frail frame now, mostly skin and bones, unable to use that strongest arrow in her quiver, her iron will, it is easy to forget what a force of personality she was in her time.She has defied tradition, overcome difficulties, fought for her beliefs and, with her random acts of kindness, has touched so many lives that her story needs to be told. Not just to celebrate her life while she is still thriving, but to tell many people who may or may not…

Ethel was born January 24, 1912, to Lester Leroy and Ada Lee Little Harris Butler at Clover Creek near Bliss, Idaho, County of Lincoln. She was next to the oldest of six children raised in the family. She was preceded in death by the oldest sister, Patricia Harris Hawks, Lucille King/Clark/Hall, the twins, Bob and Lee Butler, Bob’s sons Gary & Eddie Butler. Ethel is survived by her beloved family, a brother, Dana Lee Butler & his wife Peggy of Rawlins, Wyoming, Nieces, Carlotta Oneida, her husband Charles and family of Boise, Helen Hawks Silsby Huffman, her husband John and family of Meridian, Ellen Butler Nulsen of Greenbrier, AR, and her family, Janet Butler Corlew of San Hose; and nephews, Roy King of Seattle and family, Lynn King his wife Thessy and family of Fort Collins, Colorado. Ethel learned early in life to appreciate education, nature and the outdoors with her Father being a Forest Ranger, her mother a school teacher and grandparent’s avid teachers of the Arts, education, and science.Ethel began First Grade in a one room school house in Pine. She had completed her High School education and 3 years toward her degree at Gooding College, in Gooding, Idaho, when she met and fell in love with Herbert Coleman. They eloped and began working for Herb’s folks. The first summer was wrangling cattle, living in a covered wagon and cooking over an open fire. Ethel perfected sourdough cooking but always remembered her first “Company for dinner”, a young man riding horseback cross-country stopped to eat. As it happens she had her first flop with biscuits and they were hard as a rock. Ethel said she had remembered that embarrassment all her life, but she said “He just ate them, like they were the best he had ever had and never said a word!”  

Marshall, Tx. paper, March 4, 1985 Virgil Turnbull, 83, pioneer in commercial aviation who retired as a Braniff pilot in 1961, died Monday, March 4, 1985, in Marshall. A close friend of Wiley Post, Turnbull had learned to fly in 1923 when be bought a war surplus plane in Ardmore, Okla. He was the last person to be hired as a pilot before the airline industry adopted a policy in 1936 whereby flight officers moved up through the ranks before becoming pilots. Before joining Braniff, Mr. Turnbull was a pilot for Texas Air Transport, Southern Air Transport and other early commercial airlines. When he retired from Braniff, he had logged 6 million miles and 30,000 flying hours. He was the first Dallas-based pilot forced to retire when a Civil Aeronautics Board Rule, that pilots must retire at age 60 was adopted in 1960. Turnbull and his wife, the former Bobbie Burton, are natives of Oklahoma, where he was born in 1901. She was the first employee of Braniff Airlines, where she was head of the Braniff Hostess department when the couple met and were married in 1938. Turnbull and Post dated their friendship to the 1920s, when they were involved in stunts characteristic of the barnstorming, seat-of-the-pants pilots of those days. Post lived in Maysville and Turnbull in nearby Pauls Valley, Okla., in 1924 when the Maysville Chamber of Commerce hired Post to perform a parachute stunt for a local festival. Post hired Turnbull to fly a plane while Post jumped, but Post's family got wind of the plan and hid Post's parachute. After retirement, the Turnbulls uses a travel trailer to roam the country for a number of years. Mr. Turnbull's funeral will be 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at Sullivan Funeral Home. ———- Funeral services for Virgil Lester Turnbull, 83, of 211 Pitts Ave., Marshall, will be held at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday in colonial Chapel of Sullivan Funeral Home with…