My Grandfather

He is the one and only Sovereign Felix M. Melgar. The supreme leader in the FAR EAST. The founder of Iglesia sa Dios Espiritu Santo, Sec Reg. # 8315. He has no beginning and no end. He was born of the Holy Spirit.   It was June 19 in Inabangga Bohol, when a baby boy was found on a rock by Florpina M. Melgar. She was delighted to see the baby. She took him and brought him home. He was supposedly to be baptized by the name of Filii Dei, but the priest doesn’t agree for it means “Son of God”. So then the baby was named Felix, which means, “happy”. He came to bring happiness to his people.  As what the Lord Jesus Christ has said :  But I say the truth to you, It is profitable for you that I go away; for if I do not go away, the Comforter will not come to you; but if I go I will send him to you. Comforter/Maglilipay/Felix (c)   As he was growing up, he have shown his greatness and served his purpose.  At the age of Seven, he wandered anywhere in the town to do things he ought to do such as mingling with people, healing the sick, and many other things that the Holy Spirit has told him to do.  He was in his first grade and he was always absent because he often wanders around but even though he was always absent, he was able to answer quizzes and has shown knowledge that made his teachers wonder.       

Hans Henrich (Henry) Hofmann1712 – 1783  71 yrs.  The Immigrant Ship “Hope” (Galley) Timeline1712  22 September, born in GermanyHis family was from the village of Bockseifen in the Parish of Freudenberg.                1734  04 June, married to Margarethe Anna Huettenhen1734  Arrival in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 23 Sep 1734Traveled from Rotterdam by way of CowesCaptain Daniel Reed or Reid of the Immigrant ship Hope (Galley)Forty-nine Palatines with their families, total 127 immigrants.1734  Move to Little Fork, Virginia1735  Approx. birth of first son Tillman1747  24 March, Culpeper County, VA327 Acres from William Deathridge sold to Henry Huffman near Little Fork in Orange County.  This land became part of Culpeper County when it was created in 1749.  It is just east of Highway 229, and south of Colvin Rd, about 4 miles north of Rixeyville, VA.1748  25 August, 225 Acres purchased from Jacob Holtsclaw, Little Fork, VA. This land is located about a mile southeast of Jeffersonton, VA. 1754  French and Indian War 1754–17631755  18 September, 250 Acres purchased from James and Elizabeth PendletonCulpeper, VirginiaIn his will, Henry leaves to his son Tilman half of the land he bought from Maj. James Pendleton, and the other half to son John. In the deed for this land it says "James and Elizabeth Pendleton of Culpeper County to Henry Huffman, weaver, for L70 current money, 250 acres in the north Rappahannock River…" This indicates that at least at this time he was a weaver.  The inventory of his estate contains several items typical of the weaver trade. (In the deeds of the early to mid 1700’s, the occupation of the participants was often mentioned)1764  Residence in Culpeper County, VAHenry Huffman was on the tax rolls with 950 acres of land.  He was a lieutenant in the militia.1766  10 September, Culpeper Co., VA.Henry Huffman/Hoffman, 10 Oct 1766; 369 a. to include his patent [from the crown] with this entry in one deed; resurveyed a parcel of land for Huffman being part of…

Jeffersonton Va landscape

The Little Fork Colonyby:  Dr. B. C. HoltzclawThe Second Colony from Nassau-Siegen near Jeffersonton, Culpeper Co., VA.The First definite reference to this Colony is found in the report and diary of Brother Matthias Gottschalk, a Moravian Missionary from Pennsylvania, who visited the various German settlements in Virginia in March and April, 1748.  These reports are to be found in Volumes 11 and 12 of the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, and quite clearly identify this Colony, which has been confused in the past with the first Nassau-Siegen group that settled, first at Germanna on the Rapidan River in 1714, then later removed to Germantown on Licking Run in what is now Fauquier County.  The Second Colony was settled in the Little Fork of the Rappahannock River in the northern part of Culpeper Co., where the Hedgeman and Hazel Rivers meet to form the north branch of the Rappahannock.  The present town of Jeffersonton was laid out on land that belonged to one of the colonists, Joseph Coons.  My colleague, Professor Woodford B. Hackley, who was reared near Jeffersonton, has been of great help in tracing the members of the colony, and particularly in showing how their land adjoined around Jeffersonton.  Brother Gottschalk's "Report" states that after visiting the large and prosperous colony of Lutherans near Hebron Church he next traveled 26 miles towards the Potomac to the Great Fork of the Rappahannock (i.e., the vicinity of Germanna), where he found only three German Families still living.  Then, under the heading, "The Little Fork of the Rappahannock", he has the following to say (Va. Mag., Vol. 11, pp. 232-3):    "It is situated about twenty-two miles from the Great Fork toward the Potomik.  Twelve families of the Siegen district, being of the Reformed religion, live there close together.  They are very fine, neighborly and friendly people, who love each other in their manner and live together very peacefully.  The brother of…

Jeffersonton VA terrain

Hans Henrich Hofmann was christened on 22 Sept 1712.  He was from Bockseifen, a very small village about two miles north of Freudenberg.  In the Eighteenth Century it was in the parish of Freudenberg.He married Anna Margarethe Huettenhen of Seelbach on 4 Jun 1734.  The young couple may have spent their honeymoon in transit to America and arrived in Philadelphia on September 23, 1734.  They traveled with a German group which become known as the "Little Fork Group", which was a follow-on to the first German group from that area who came in 1714.  They left Nassau-Siegen, Westphalia, Germany, and entered America through Philadelphia and on to Culpeper Co., VA. Soon thereafter, Hans Hendrick became known as Henry Huffman.Hans Henrich Hoffman, 22 and Anna Margret, 20 traveled on the ship “Hope” and are listed in [List 37 A, B, C] Hope (Galley) with Captain, Daniel Reed or Reid, from Rotterdam by way of Cowes, arrival in Philadelphia,September 23, 1734Henry and Anna had 13 children:1.       Tillman Huffman was born 1735 ~ 1736 in Culpeper, Culpeper, VA, and died 1826 in Culpeper, Culpeper, VA. He married ?. She was born 1737, and died 1792. He married Margaret Williams Freeman 22 AUG 1794.2.      John Huffman was born 1737 in Virginia, and died 1772 in Culpeper, Culpeper, VA.3.       Mary Huffman was born 1739 in Virginia.4.       Elizabeth Huffman was born 1741 in Virginia. She married John Young.5.       Joseph Huffman was born 1745 in Virginia, and died 1830 in Culpeper, Culpeper, VA.6.      Alice Huffman was born 1747 in Virginia. She married James Spilman 1772. He was born 1721, and died 1790.7.      James Huffman was born 1755 ~ 1760, and died 1839 in Culpeper, Culpeper, VA. He married Letty Arnold 02 FEB 1795 in Culpeper, Culpeper, VA. She was born ~ 1775.8.      Elsbeth Huffman was born 1750.9.      Susannah Huffman was born 1753 in Virginia.10.  Catherine Huffman was born 1755.11.  Eve Huffman was born 1757 in Virginia.12.  Harman…

18th century ship example image

Journey of our family from the old world to the new worldThe journey to America was divided into three stages; the first part was down the Rhine to Rotterdam, which was slow and time consuming; the second was from Rotterdam to some English port, usually Cowes on the Isle of Wright where ships were provisioned and clearance papers were obtained; the third was the crossing of Atlantic ocean itself.All immigrants from Germany and Switzerland were supposed to be supplied with several papers; a passport from the town mayor certifying to the good character of the immigrant family, and a letter of recommendation from a pastor of the church to which they belonged.When the ship reached Philadelphia, a medical officer boarded it and examined all passengers. If anyone had a contagious disease, the ship stood a mile offshore until cleared. Then all male passengers above the age of 16 were marched to the Philadelphia courthouse and signed the oath of allegiance to the British crown. They also signed the oath of abjuration and fidelity to the proprietor and the laws of the province. Then they were all brought back to the ship. Announcements were printed in papers stating how many of the new arrivals were to be sold and how much they owed. Those who had money or could borrow enough were release and the others were sold into servitude.Passage cost from $27 to $90 per person. Supplies were often consumed before the journey was half over. These were supplemented from the ships stores which had to be paid for before the passenger was released. Supplies and baggage were sometimes lost or stolen and as a result many became indebted who originally had enough to pay their passage. Seven years of service per passenger was required at one time during the early period of immigration. Sometimes two brothers served three and one half years each for the one who could not…

ship arrival notice

Example of article published on the arrival of an immigrant shipShip: St. Andrew Captain: Robert Brown Master Arrival: Charleston SC, Dec 31, 1744 The passengers on the 1744 voyage of the St. Andrew may have contracted to be delivered to Philadelphia, but the ship was diverted by Capt. Brown to the port of Charleston. Marianne S. Wokeck, Trade in Strangers: The Beginnings of Mass Migration to North America (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999). p. 274: "The papers in Philadelphia (Pennsylvanische Berichte, American Weekly Mercury) reported that the captain in effect forced the German immigrants to land in Charleston rather than Philadelphia and that the ship was chased by French privateers." From The South Carolina Gazette, January 1745 The South Carolina Gazette showed that the St. Andrew had left the harbor, Monday, January 7th 1745 Numb 563 Custom House Charlestown Enter’d     Inwards Ship St. Andrew, Robert Brown from Cowes Enter’d     Outwards Ship St. Andrew, Robert Brown for CowesShip arrival Advertisements in The South Carolina Gazette Monday January 7th 1745 Numb 563 Monday January 14th 1745 Numb 564 Monday January 21st 1745 Numb 565Brentwood’s Petitions For Land from South Carolina Council Journals  1745 Page 11: Meeting of 2d January 1744/5His Excellency also aquatinted the Board that the Palatine Protestants to the number of one hundred, who had lately arrived in Capt. Brown’s Ship came on the 31st of December last, in a Body to the Council Chamber and took the State Oaths to His Majesty, all of them having determined to remain and settle in this Province.24 Jan 1744/5: Read the petition of a considerable number of Protestant Palatines, most humbly showing that the poor petitioners have been on board the St. Andrew’s, Captain Brown commander, these twenty-six weeks past, and there is as yet no likelihood for them to get free of her, because there are none of us yet who have purchased their service; they therefore humbly pray his Excellency and Honors that they may…

Immigrant ship Hope

A list of the Passengers on Board the Ship Hope Galley, Daniel Reed,Comandr. [Qualified Sepr 23d 1734.]   MENS NAMES – AGES Jacobus Bowman 28Bernhartus Richard 29Fredrick Kufer 63 Jacob Koser 23 Hans Hendrick Holman 22 Hans Jacob Fishbach 30 John Wilhelm Kras 48 Michal Gerber 27 Christian Houser 50 Peter Gortner 30 Michal Fikle 25 Ulrich Buler 29 Joanis Richter 26 Phillip Esping 28 Christian Farnie 27 Joanis Keyser 50 Jurgen Heynsman 45 Joanis Heynsman 16 Johan Adam Shroof 25 Johan Peter Groose 30 Johan Hendrick Klaknor 45 Peter Sram 20 August Henrich Kuntsman 22 Johan Henrich Heinsman 30 Christopher Rabie 27 Johan Phillip Duldt 19 Henrich Steldts 31 Zacharias Ohlbach 36 Zacharias Flomerfield 21 Johan Wilhelm Ohlbach 28 Johanis Jung 40 Jost Smith 46 Peter Smith 17 Johanis Nohe 40 Johan Henrich Otterbach 30 Johan Herbert Weber 22 George Lubcken 25 Joanis Peter Apgard 20 Simon Kierbach 23 Johan Arent Riesh 28 Siemonis Beuell 16 Johan Henrich Weshbach 24 Johan Henrich Otterbach 21 Johan Jurg Anthony Miller 25 Joahin Andreas Miller 21 Anthony Noble 53 Anthony Noble, Junr 18 Johan Alberts Longerfield 30 Godtfrid Sheerwagen 49 Christian Otto Schultz 22 Carl Fulker 23 John Robeson, Brit. 30 Wilhelm Haer 54 Cornelius Paraed 23 Francis Dasons 21 John Delmer 23 Patrick Camell 20 Darbie Silvin 24 John Gamel 20 Daniel Cammeron 21 William Pursell 30 Oyn Doniwand 26 Bernhard Camell 27 Mark Fey 20 Bernhard Megie 26 Dorbie Carie 21 Nathaniel Morrin 30 John Nouland 24 Joseph Lameer 24 Barnable Franchie 22 John Grun 40 John Camerson 40 William Carter 23 Patrick Heney 21   WOMENS NAMES – AGES Anna Margret Hofman 20 Cathrina Fishbach 28 Sophia Margret Kraz 36 Eliza Cathrine Jongen 32 Anna Catbrine Jongen 20 Eliza Maria Holdinghousen 30 Anna Gerber 22 Maria Leshrin 17 Barbera Heglerin 52 Anna Housrin 50 Johanna Housrin 16 Anna Margritta Clundin 20 Anna Magdelena Bechtlerin 26 Anna Eliza Farnie 23 Cathrine Farnie 29 Maria Cathrine Keyserin 48 Johanna Keystin 20 Anna Maria Beuler 33 Cathrine Heynsman 45 Susanna Heynsman 20 Maria Cathrine Shroof 23 Anna Cathrine Grootz 26 Clara Klacknerin 37 Anna Dumat Ohlbach 37 Anna Cathrine Fock 20 Gerderuth Flomerfield 21 Anna Eliza Ohlbach 26 Anna Maria Jongen 32 Eliza Bechtlerin 57 Maria Barbara Bechtlerin 18 Anna Maria Bechtlerin 20 Anna Christina Smith 45 Eliza Magdelen Smith 20 Maria Clara Nohe 40 Gerderuth Nohe 16 Anna Maria Kierbach 26 Freyja Cathrine Kierbach 21 Maria Riesh 28 Maria Margret Weshbach 19 Anna Maria Beust 17 Maria Eliza Bomerin 18 Catharine Noble 42 Christ. Eliza Longerfield 36 Regina Barbera Spedin 40 Susanna Zimmerman 20   CHILDRENS NAMES –  AGES Johan Casper Krazs 11 Johan Phillip Krazs…

18th century ship example image

The following letter gives some details about the passage of the immigrant ship "Hope" in 1734. David Seipt  – An Immigrant's Letter, 1734  Note: The original of the following letter, written by David Seipt, was in the possession of the late John F. Hartranft, by whose direction a translation was made for the late A. H. Seipt, of which this is a copy. Germantown, Dec. 20, 1734.THE grace of God be with you.To my faithful brother David Seipt: Most worthy and dearly loved brother and sister – I, my wife and my children and other good friends send you kindly and heartfelt greetings, wishing you the grace and peace of God Almighty in spiritual and temporal things. Dearly loved brother, it is but reasonable that I should write you a detailed account of the long and distant journey which we have (Thank God) safely ended and tell you how uneasy I was that this was not done upon the first opportunity. It happened through the neglect of a certain person who had promised me to notify me (as I was not in Philadelphia) when the mail would be gathered. As an account of our journey from our company in general has been sent to our brethren remaining in Germany and our Fatherland Silesia (which if safely carried has no doubt reached you ere this) I will restrict myself to what concerns and befell me, my wife and children. You are already acquainted with all that transpired between home and our arrival upon the banks of the river Mense in Holland. Upon leaving Helfort, the last city in Holland, we encountered considerable though not unusually high winds. Though no danger was apprehended, the ship was mightily rocked by the waves, which produced the usual unpleasant sensations of seasickness, to which nearly all the passengers succumbed. I was not much affected, but mother (Judith) suffered pretty severely. Our oldest son Christopher was likewise but slightly affected, but…

Reports of Cases Decided in the Supreme Court of Appeals and in the General Court of Virginia by Peachy R. Grattan Volume VII from April 1, 1850 to July 1, 1851page 613*Grayson v. The Commonwealth. (Absent FIELD.• J.) June Term. 1850.Criminal Law – New Trial – After Two Concurring Verdicts — A new trial granted to a prisoner convicted of murder in the first degree, after two concurring verdicts, approved by the judge who presided at the trials: the evidence being wholly insufficient to sustain the verdict and judgment.This is the sequel of the case reported in 6th Grattan, p. 712. The prisoner was again tried at the June term of the Circuit court of Culpeper county for 1850, when he was again found guilty of murder in the first degree, and sentenced to be hung.The prisoner moved the Court to set aside the verdict and judgment, on the ground that the verdict was contrary to the evidence; but the Court overruled the motion. Whereupon the prisoner excepted, and applied to this Court for a writ of error, which was awarded.The facts spread upon the record are in most respects the same as those which appeared on the former trial; and they are stated fully in the report of the case in 6th Grattan. The only differences in the statement of the evidence are, first, as to the time when the young men left the store on the evening previous to the murder. It was stated on the last trial that two of them remained about fifteen minutes after the others went away; ana when they left it was the darkest time of the night, the moon shining brightly all night. Second. The evidence as to the appearance of the prisoner at Huffman's cabin, and his going out with another negro and a white boy, to hunt his spade and shovel, is wholly omitted. Third. It is proved that the…

Reports of Cases Decided in the Supreme Court of Appeals and in the General Court of Virginia by Peachy R. Grattan Volume VI from April 1, 1849 to April1, 1850Page 7121849. December Term.Grayson v. The Commonwealth. (Absent Field,* J.) 1. New trials are grantable at the Instance of the accused. In all criminal cases.2. Motions for new trials are governed by the same rules in criminal as in civil cases.3. A new trial will be granted where the verdict is against law; or where it is contrary to the evidence; or where the verdict is without evidence.4. Where some evidence has been given which tends to prove the facts in issue; or the evidence consists of circumstances and presumptions, a new trial will not be granted merely because the Court, if on the jury, would have given a different verdict. The evidence should be plainly insufficient to warrant the finding of the jury: And this restriction applies a fortiori, to an appellate Court.5. Where the evidence is contradictory, and the verdict Is against the weight of evidence, a new trial may be granted by the Court which presides at the trial; but its decision Is not the subject of a writ of error or supersedeas, or examinable by an appellate Court. *He had tried the cause in the Circuit court.Page 7136. Where the evidence is contradictory, the Court which tries 1849. the case, cannot be required to state in a bill of exceptions, either the evidence or the facts proved by the witnesses respectively: It is enough to state that the evidence was contradictory.William Grayson, a free negro, was indicted in the Case. Circuit court of Culpeper county, for the murder of David W. Miller. Upon the trial, the jury found him guilty of murder in the first degree; and the Court sentenced him to be hung. The prisoner thereupon moved the Court for a new trial, but the Court overruled the motion;…